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Impressions in Ballpoint Pen Art

In my painting Sunny Day, I’m introducing a beautiful architectural work, the Church of Cosmas and Damian.

Constructed in 1794 and located in Kaluga, it is different in style from the typical architectural structures of that time, like St. Petersburg classic construction of that era, which leads to the conclusion that the church is designed by one of the pupils of the famous architect V.V. Rastrelli.

Although I briefly touched on the subject in the past, in the artwork Sunny Day the emphasis falls on all the beauty of the Orthodox architecture highlighting it`s historical values.

In this atypical creation I attempt to focus the viewer’s attention first on the experience perceived from the painting, additional details will slowly come to light later. If the theater of light and shadows created in blue monochrome conveys the feeling of a sunny day, then several figures dressed in light jackets allow the viewer to feel the temperature of the air. Carelessly traced surrounding trees redirect the viewer’s attention to the church, allowing to fully enjoy the beauty and grandeur of this architectural monument.

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The World At His Fingertips - By Ronald Bell

 

Essentially confined to his homeland of Eastern Ukraine, no thanks to powers-that-be battling powers-that-wish-to-be, Andrey Poletaev can luckily travel vast distances without ever having to leave his home. Ballpoint pen in hand he can set off in any direction, as he pleases. No passport. No security checkpoints. No borders. Call it the luck of The Draw. The ability to use art as an escape to lands known-or-unknown proves how drawing skills and "vision" are a magic combination. No formal art education or diploma necessary. Imagination plays a part for many artists, but Poletaev's travels are decidedly more terrestrial. He could be logging frequent flyer mileage. And if his visual documentations thus far don't merit a "diploma", he can simply draw one. 

View original article by Ronald Bell on The Ballpointer